Don’t Be Mine

13 02 2018

Happy Feel-Left-Out-if-You’re-Single Day! This Valentine card is probably from the 1940s, and just to be a tease I did not scan the interior. Complete the rhyme however you like! I just love how Egypt can be worked into the most arbitrary list of unrelated things.

-Valentine, sphinx-small





Armchair Traveler

18 09 2017

The end of the Victorian era produced numerous travel journals by both scholars and Joe Adventurer, all equally suspect in terms of veracity but at least full of interesting imagery and bound in eye-catching covers. This example, Our New Way Round the World, by the colorfully surnamed Charles Carleton Coffin, was published in 1887. It is not exclusively about Egypt, but iconography from the land was chosen for the cover art. As usual, “artistic” license was taken with some, though not all, illustrations.





A Quieter Ride

26 12 2016

This 1957 ad (detail shown) promotes the new cars manufactured by GM which featured reduced road noise thanks to specific designs by Fisher Body (a division of GM) – in this particular example, the 1958 Oldsmobile Ninety-Eight Holiday Coupe is shooting past the Great Sphinx in what is accurately captioned “a dramatic portrayal.”

fisher-body-detail





Town Crier

15 11 2016

I had the pleasure of visiting Centralia, Illinois this month and swung by the Sentinel Newspaper building, which is a fabulous 1920’s Egyptian Revival structure. Because my blog is solely about my collection of Egyptomania objects, you’ll have to look at other people’s photos of this building online. But here is a scan of their newspaper heading, which has now been added to my stash. “Egypt’s Greatest Daily” refers to the nickname of that region – the lower sixteen counties of Illinois are correctly called Egypt (incorrectly called Little Egypt, even by locals, who forget that this moniker refers to a hoochy-koochy dancer at the 1893 Columbian Exposition.)

3102_001-small





Feed Me

26 08 2016

Which one of these things doesn’t belong in the group?
Paper, Sphinx, Refrigerator, Advertising
Ha! Trick question. They all belong together, at least in this c.1955 advertisement from Consolidated Enamel Papers. One of their clients, Servel, used their product to publish their newsletter. Servel manufactured refrigerators, and one of their ad campaigns featured their product between the paws of the Great Sphinx, which is reproduced in Consolidated’s ad. A pretty nifty coincidence, since any of Servel’s numerous ads could have been chosen – but once again, the fascination with Egypt won out, not once but twice.
Consolidated-small








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