Feed Me

26 08 2016

Which one of these things doesn’t belong in the group?
Paper, Sphinx, Refrigerator, Advertising
Ha! Trick question. They all belong together, at least in this c.1955 advertisement from Consolidated Enamel Papers. One of their clients, Servel, used their product to publish their newsletter. Servel manufactured refrigerators, and one of their ad campaigns featured their product between the paws of the Great Sphinx, which is reproduced in Consolidated’s ad. A pretty nifty coincidence, since any of Servel’s numerous ads could have been chosen – but once again, the fascination with Egypt won out, not once but twice.

Everything’s Coming Up…Lotuses

10 08 2016

This elegant letterhead from the late 1800s is embellished with lotus blossoms.


Ancient Words

28 06 2016

This 1978 newspaper ad describes the modern technology to be implemented during the American exhibitions of King Tut’s artifacts. That’s right – the cassette tape. Those of you who don’t know what that is – try Wikipedia. And my peeps who grew up with them – feeling pretty ancient yourselves, no?

ER TDK ad-small

Grateful Fashion

13 06 2016

This hieroglyphic tie is from the Jerry Garcia Grateful Dead collection. Rock on.


1984 Pyramid Pinball Wizard

4 05 2016

“It all began thousands of miles beyond the mouth of the Nile River in a fertile region known today as Bally Midway….Preserved in all its monolithic glory lay the treasures of Black Pyramid. Never before had modern civilization had the chance to marvel at the rich ornamental sculpting of its cabinetry, the majesty of its flashing lights, the gleaming opulence of its regal flippers. Now from the far corners of Bally Midway, the legend known as Black Pyramid lives again.”

Bally pinball ad 1-small

Bally pinball ad 2-small

Up and Away

23 04 2016

Egyptianizing themes are found more frequently than expected in transportation-related advertising applications. For example, this 1940s ad from the Warner Aircraft Corporation, which announces the opening of their new “Scarab” engine plant. There is no reference explaining this choice of iconography, but I suppose one might draw a correlation to the Egyptian god Khepera, who was believed to push the sun on its course through the sky.

Warner engines ad-large


30 03 2016

This polyester shirt from the 1970s is patterned with ancient Egyptian maidens. The red, white, and blue coloring adds an unexpected pop to the extra-severe linear design. I might just have to bust this out for the Fourth of July.


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